2016 Winter Session

Listed below are short descriptions of our 2016 Winter Session courses. The instructor will post the actual course syllabi for registered students shortly before term begins or distribute them on the first day of class.  Please check the course schedule for current information about our course offerings.

COURSE OFFERINGS 2016W (As of DEC-16-2016)

Literature Courses

There is currently no description available for this section of ENGL 110. Please contact the instructor.

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
MWF, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

This course aims to introduce students to university level literary study by exploring a set of texts concerned with a question of perhaps particular relevance to first-year students:  what should guide how we design our lives?  Technical knowledge? The profit motive? Devotion to one’s family?  One’s nation?  One’s God? One’s own will? Romantic love? Sensuous hedonism? Prudent practicality? Imprudent idealism?  Visionary fantasy? All, some or none of the above?  The question of your destiny may seem especially wide open at the beginning of your university career, but one lesson of the texts of this course is that this question is never resolved.  The one thing that can be said about your destiny is that it will never stop posing questions. This can be both a good and a bad thing: while it grants us inexhaustible potential for self-determination, it also exposes us to manipulation and even coersion by social, political, technological and economic forces outside ourselves. Such issues challenge us no less than they challenge the writers and characters you will study in this course, which suggests that the task of literary study has a lot in common with the task of designing a life. Texts include:  Hamlet, Frankenstein, Bartleby the Scrivener, Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, and a selection of modernist poetry, film and popular music.

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
MWF, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

The readings and discussions for this course ask us to consider how literature helps us to imagine “nature.” These questions are central to our endeavors: how does literature shape our relationship to nature, and does literature about nature help us to think and act differently in an era of climate change? Our syllabus will be divided into five mini-themes, all of which represent a powerful way that literature has imagined nature: “catastrophe,” “pastoral,” “picturesque,” “sublime,” and “wilderness.” We shall explore these themes in drama (William Shakespeare and Tom Stoppard), fiction (Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ursula Le Guin, Joseph Conrad, and Ann Radcliffe), poetry (Coleridge, Jonson, Keats, Marlowe, Marvell, Virgil, Whitman, Wordsworth), and contemporary art, film, and journalism.

Course Prerequisite: In order to remain registered in this class, all students must fulfill the First-Year English Course Entry Requirement (LPI). For further details on the First-Year English Course Entry Requirement, please visit: http://english.ubc.ca/first-year-english/frequently-asked-questions-faq/#1.

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
MWF, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

In this course we will be focusing on a selection of contemporary origin stories in different genres and on the complexities and ambiguities of 'English' in these contexts.  We'll be considering questions like: how many Englishes make up contemporary Canada?  what happens to traditional concepts of genre when the great divide between poetry and prose, 'reality' and 'imagination' is challenged? whose 'tradition' and whose ways of knowing prevail?  Two novels --Eden Robinson's Monkey Beach and David Chariandy's  Soucouyant--  are at the heart of the course together with a selection of poems, short stories, and an interactive website.  Thanks to these writers, you'll never see Canada the same way again!

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
MWF, 2:00-3:00

Along with substantial work on poetry, this section of English 110 will focus on one play and two novels about shipwrecks and the people who survive them. In addition to the excitement of disaster, we will consider the significance of the ways in which the loss of what the characters understand to be “civilization” leads them to think about some of the big questions with which human beings have long struggled: What makes us human and not animal? What is human nature? What about race, gender and other kinds of difference? Who has power and why? What about God, and is that the same thing as religion?

This course introduces students to the analytical skills essential to university-level reading, thinking and writing (and to future employers!). Texts are the sci-fi classic HG Wells’ The Island of Dr. Moreau; Yann Martel’s bestseller The Life of Pi; and Shakespeare’s brilliant The Tempest. Our longest text is the fascinating and fabulous Life of Pi, so consider reading that over the summer—you’ll thank yourself in November!

ENGL 110 counts as 3 credits toward most faculties’ English/Writing requirements, and also can count as 3 credits of the Faculty of Arts Literature requirement.

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
T (Tutorial), 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.; Th (Lecture), 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

This course is an introduction to the study of narrative elements, or the art of storytelling, through Canadian fiction, drama, poetry, and film. Why are narratives important for organizing human experience?  How and why do writers manipulate narrative time?  How does the storyteller assert persuasive power?  How does narrative represent the identities of individuals and groups?

These questions and others will be taken up in lectures, discussion groups, and readings in the core textbook on narrative by H. Porter Abbott, The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative, 2nd Edition.  Creative writing optional assignments will also be provided.

Fiction:  Madeleine Thien, Simple Recipes; and Michael Ondaatje, In the Skin of a Lion.
Drama: John Gray and Eric Peterson, Billy Bishop Goes to War.
Poetry: a concise course packet of selected poems.
Film:  Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (Isuma/NFB 2001): Directed by Zacharias Kunuk; story and screenplay by Paul Apak Angilirk; English screenplay by Norman Cohn. The screenplay version is available at the Koerner library and the film is also streamed through the following website (click on  “view in SD”): http://www.isuma.tv/hi/en/fastrunnertrilogy

Course Requirements: 1 in-class essay; 1 home essay; pop quizzes; a final exam.

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
MWF, 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

This section of ENGL 110 is organized around the theme of “Texts as/and Technologies”. It examines the ways in which media innovations inspire literary experimentation. It will investigate the ways in which both the form and content of literary works from the 1850s onward have been inspired and impacted by the potential of emerging technologies of transmission and transcription (from the telegraph, telephone, and typewriter, to email, Facebook, and Twitter). Texts will include Dracula, Votes for Women, Passing, and Cloud Atlas, as well as short works of poetry and fiction.

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
MWF, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

This section of 110 will examine literary representations of power through a set of texts that outline political power, personal power, narrative power and sexual power in a variety of genres.  Representative works will include Shakespeare’s Richard the Third, Melville’s Billy Budd, Orwell’s 1984, and Tony Kushner’s Angel’s in America. Poets will include Shakespeare, Milton, Blake, Emily Dickinson and others.  Questions will include the effect of power, the nature of power, the fear of power and the power of lies. To create or to question power will be one of our concerns. Or do we accept Emily Dickinson’s more general directive: “To be Alive -- Is Power” balanced against Information as Power: An Anthology of Selected. US Army War College Student Papers, Vol. 4 (2010)?

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
MWF, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

One of the most enduring principles of European cultural traditions that trace their heritage to Aristotle and Plato has been the relationship between art and nature. Does art, as Aristotle claimed, imitate nature? Does it (according to Hamlet) “hold, as ’twere, the mirror up to nature”? Isn’t that really just the same thing, and wasn’t Hamlet having trouble telling the difference anyway? Or does nature, as Oscar Wilde declared, imitate art? Finally, after 2,500 years of dispute, this class will resolve the question. Or maybe not, but we will use the art/nature relationship as a theme to guide our discussion of a variety of literary forms from a variety of historical eras, and we will investigate whether there may be alternative ways to understand both the purposes of literature and how the human relates to the non-human. The art-nature binary has been significant to much more than just matters of aesthetic appreciation. Its implications can be found in philosophy, the sciences, and in politics. If, as many thinkers argue, we are entering a post-human age, what will happen to our conceptions of nature, and how does art contribute to them? Readings will include drama by Wilde and Shakespeare, fiction by Alice Munro and Jeanette Winterson, and poetry by all kinds of people.

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
MWF, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Tales of horror and aberrant human (or non-human) behaviour form a consistent tradition from ancient times to the present. This section of English 110 will trace the history of what became known as “Gothic” literature in the 19th century, examining what human beings in general, and what particular historical periods, have considered most disturbing and abhorrent. We will consider the difficult problem of why we seem so attracted to themes and situations that should normally repel us. In keeping with the standard format of English 110, we will proceed through a series of texts under the headings of drama, poetry and fiction. Under drama, will be study Euripides’ Medea and Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Following an examination of poems by Coleridge, Tennyson, Poe and Rossetti, will be look at a selection of stories from The Oxford Book of Gothic Tales and the original Dracula novel by Bram Stoker. Evaluation will be based on a mid-term text, a final essay, a final exam and class participation.

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
MWF, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

English 110 engages fiction, drama, and poetry: fabulous course description coming shortly!

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
T (Lecture), 12:00 - 2:00 p.m.; Th (Tutorial), 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

How do we define ourselves – as Canadians, as artists, as lovers, as survivors? These are some of the broad issues of identity and belonging we will explore through a selection of fiction, drama and poetry in this section of English 110.  We will consider ways in which individuals craft and perform the "selves" they wish to be, and the multiplicity of ways in which writers convey these identities through literary texts. To what extent do we control the person we become and to what extent are we shaped by our community? How meaningful are the concepts of ethnicity, gender and nationality in the creation of identity? How can a writer convey the complex and shifting nature of individual and group identity through the permanence of written discourse? Texts studied will include a novel (Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden), a play (The Rez Sisters by Tomson Highway), and a selection of short stories and poetry. In lectures and seminars, students will engage with concepts of genre and form in literature and will pursue hands-on practice of methods of literary analysis. Students will be encouraged to develop independent critical responses to the works studied. Assessment will include two in-class essays, a term paper and a final examination.

Approaches to Non-fictional Prose
Term 1
MWF, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

We tend to think of nature as something “out there” to be admired, feared, conquered, exploited, and penetrated. Many artists, ecologists, and activists urge us to treat nature with respect, care, and devotion. But is this not to treat nature in the same “objective” spirit?  Are there other ways to conceive of nature and all the things in it? In this course we will read a selection of essays and books that try to describe and contemplate the natural world and our relationship with it from a variety of scientific, journalistic, and autobiographical perspectives - without necessarily reducing that world to “the stuff out there.” We will consider what these works say about being human (or “inhuman”) by working through the “nature” of race, gender, culture, empire, technology, and indigeneity. Texts on the course include Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild, Robyn Davidon’s Tracks, Maria Campbell’s Halfbreed, and Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place as well as essays by Francis Bacon, Percy Shelley, Henry David Thoreau, Kathleen Jamie, and Michael Pollan.

Approaches to Non-fictional Prose
Term 2
MWF, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

There is currently no description available for this section of ENGL 111. Please contact the instructor.

Literature and Criticism
Term 1
MWF, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

Enriched study of selected works of literature from a number of critical perspectives. Open to students with a BC-equivalent mark of "A" in English 12 or "B+" in English Literature 12. Essays are required. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

We'll proceed by means of close reading and discussion.  Students will write essays and, on occasion, give short, informal presentations.

Primary Texts:

  • Hemingway, In Our Time
  • Chopin, The Awakening
  • Salinger, Nine Stories
  • Plath, The Bell Jar
  • DeLillo, End Zone
  • McCarthy, The Road
  • Williams, Keywords

Literature and Criticism
Term 2
MWF, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

An enriched course in English studies meant for students with a passion for reading; it is particularly suited to students intending to pursue an Honours or Major degree in English.  In weekly lectures and discussions, we will read literary and critical texts dealing with climate change and the environment from a variety of historical periods and geographical places.  You will be encouraged to read deeply, to reflect on and practise a variety of critical approaches to the texts you read, and to extend your abilities as thinkers, speakers, and writers.  Authors will include William Wordsworth, Henry David Thoreau, H. G. Wells, Margaret Atwood, Sigmund Freud, Jamaica Kincaid, Charles Dickens, John Ruskin, Jeff VanderMeer, and others.

Course Prerequisite: Students must have a final grade of "A" in English 12 (BC equivalent) or "B+" in English Literature 12 (BC equivalent) to remain registered.

Course Expectations: Regular attendance and participation in the activities of the class; a minimum of three essays, two to be written in class and one at home; and a final examination.

Grading: Course work, 70%; Final examination, 30%.


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Writing Courses

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 1
MWF, 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

In this class we'll look at love stories old and new and try and tackle some big questions about happy ever after: How do stories shape our expectations and experiences of romantic love? What do our conventional love narratives suggest about gender, sexuality, and marriage? How do individual experiences of love deviate from these narratives--and why should we care? How have our love stories changed along with shifts in cultural attitudes about love and marriage?

Prepare to rethink some of your assumptions about love and romance and investigate our cultural obsession with meet cutes and happy endings.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 1
MWF, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

This course offers an introduction to the skills of literary criticism. Our theme is mad science, a concept we explore by reading a handful of literary works, ancient, modern, and contemporary. Each of these works raises important questions about scientific knowledge and human culture. What are the relations between scientific knowledge and power? How should we understand scientific practice in realtion to the emotions? What are the consequences, both for humankind and for nonhumans, of scientific invention? We will examine critcism itself as a science or form of technical knowledge.

Readings include: excerpts from Aristotle's Poetics; Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound; Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; or the Modern Prometheus (1818); R.L. Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886); and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go (2005). We will explore each of these texts in their critical, historical, and theoretical contexts, reading secondary sources that will help us to understand these texts and that serve as examples of literary criticism.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 1
MWF, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

What are bad manners? The idea of manners, broadly construed, captures not only what we expect from others in society, but also what we expect from ourselves. This section of ENGL 110 takes up literary representations of civility and decorum – and their (often comic) violations. Why, for instance, do we behave the way we do in social situations? What are the rewards of avoiding being perceived as rude? Does politeness come ‘naturally’? We will pursue these and further questions in a term-long inquiry into the unarticulated assumption and expectations that underlie everyday social rituals and performances. Our texts include eighteenth-century insult poems, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, T. S. Eliot’s "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," Noël Coward’s Hay Fever, and Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day.

Reading and Writing About Literature
Term 1
MWF, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

Writing can both define and trouble claims to home or to belonging. In this course, we will examine ways in which the domestic, the native, the town, and the nation—among other configurations—create economies and ecologies of home, even as they disrupt and refigure such networks of relations. Assignments will include a response blog, an annotated bibliography, a close reading, a research proposal, a research essay and a final examination. Core texts will include Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; W. B. Yeats, Selected Poems and Four Plays; Alice Munro, Selected Stories; Gwendolyn Brooks, Selected Poems; Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, Red: A Haida Manga.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 1
MWF, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

Why did a king kiss a werewolf-knight? Do men with canine heads go to heaven? How is a werewolf like a cyborg? If a human child lives among wolves, will she speak their language? In reading werewolf literature from the Middle Ages to the present day, we will explore how racial and sexual difference overlap with human-animal hybridity and metamorphosis in Western literature. We will also consider what werewolves can teach us about language, disability, childhood, indigeneity, and migration. Readings include Marie de France's Bisclavret, Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Barlow's Sharp Teeth, and Lai's When Fox is a Thousand.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 1
MWF, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

This literature-and-writing course offers you literary texts that transform themselves through semantic and symbolic play, and texts we will transform by situating them in material cultural contexts. With transformation as our theme in both content and method, we will use our classroom as if it were a makerspace -- a space in which makers collaborate, experiment, code, and test their prototypes and ideas. You may expect the course will augment the pleasures you take in reading complex literary works, and help you construct sound arguments about verbal texts more confidently. The tentative reading list (under construction) includes stories from Ovid, Hemingway’s “Big Two-Hearted River,” O’Brien’s At Swim-Two-Birds, Larsen’s Quicksand, Carter’s Nights at the Circus, and poems by Blake, Yeats, Moore, and Eliot.4 papers (1p, 2-3pp, 3-5pp, 5-7pp), midterm, final exam, and participation. More info at blogs.ubc.ca/jpaltin.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 1
TTh, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

Why do we tell stories? The very phrase “telling stories” is synonymous, to quote the Houyhnhnms in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, with saying “the thing which is not.” Yet most story-tellers are trying to articulate “the thing which is,” however they might define that in socio-political and/or aesthetic terms. In this course we will explore story-telling—our own and others’. What assumptions underlie our readings of stories in prose and verse and the numerous critical and theoretical approaches to literary interpretation? What does the popularization and commodification of texts, such as the re-visioning of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in every medium, tell us about the texts themselves, the societies that produced them, our own society, and ourselves? What difference does it make if the “source texts” for a story are actual historical events? Some of the texts that we will be studying self-consciously question the nature of “story,” “history,” and “truth”; all raise questions about the nature of story-telling, interpretation, identity, and society. Our texts: Christina Rossetti, “Goblin Market” (online); Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (Broadview), “Jabberwocky” (online); Iris Murdoch, Under the Net (Penguin); A. S. Byatt, “The Story of the Eldest Princess” (UBC Connect); Michael Ondaatje, Anil’s Ghost (Vintage), selections from Handwriting (Koerner Reserve).

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 1
TTh, 12:30 - 2:00 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

In this course, we will explore five iconic, and very different, literary depictions of evil. In Doctor Faustus, a polymath scholar, tired of the limits of existing knowledge, sells himself to the devil in order to go beyond them. In The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, a sailor on an expedition in search of Antarctica commits an act of cruelty and finds himself facing the ghosts of the slave trade—and “the nightmare Life-in-Death.” In Dracula, a Transylvanian aristocrat finds ways to reproduce his “blood” in western Europe. In The Master and Margarita, a trio of devils—one in the shape of a cat—cause havoc in Stalin’s Russia. And in Beloved, the legacies of Atlantic slavery are explored through their terrible effects on the lives of one African American family. Aimed at students who are thinking about majoring in English (or in another humanities field), this course will teach you the skills of literary analysis through an engagement with these texts and some of the questions they raise. (What is evil? What forms does it take? How and why has it preoccupied modern writers?) You will learn how to ask rich and compelling questions of your own about literature, and how to explore possible answers in dialogue with other scholars, while developing skills as a clear, logical, and persuasive writer that will serve you well throughout your university studies, and beyond.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 2
MWF, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This course will be an exciting exploration of the intricacies, conflicts, and possibilities of late twentieth, early twenty-first century identity through analysis and discussion of a variety of fictional and critical texts. We will begin with Fred Wah’s biotext Diamond Grill, and his racial shame over his cravings for garlic and rice, before moving onto Trumpet and discussions on sexuality, gender, physicality, and the trans-. The course will next shift to a consideration of the blurred line between humans and machines in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? before concluding with conversations on the Internet and social media through our reading of Feed. Our understandings of identity will undergo a constant layering process as we examine the specific identity questions in each of the works. The course will also incorporate secondary articles as we develop your critical thinking skills, your research capabilities, and your abilities to construct clear and effective written argumentation. Expect a mind altering, engaging, and enlightening ride.

Reading and Writing About Literature
Term 2
MWF, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

In this writing intensive course, we’ll study the genre of literary non-fiction or memoir, and think about how the genre has been important to literary history and literary studies. We’ll also think about the ways in which the genre of literary non-fiction merges the boundaries between literature (poetry and fiction) and research nonfiction (journalism and academic writing) to tell stories about actual people, places and events.

What are some of the problems inherent in this commingling of genres based on fiction and fact? What are some of the ethical, formal and aesthetic concerns? How might we, as readers, writers and researchers, benefit from reading, learning about and practicing this genre?

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 2
MWF, 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

In this section of English 100 we will study a selection of English literature from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries: poetry by William Wordsworth and John Keats, as well as the novel Persuasion by Jane Austen.  Since one purpose of the course is to introduce students to different critical approaches to literature, we will examine two scholarly essays on the assigned work of each author.  In both the proposal for their research essay and the essay itself, students will be expected not only to offer their own interpretations of a literary text or texts, but also to cite, demonstrate their familiarity with, and above all respond to a minimum number of secondary sources.  Ideally, then, this course will teach students the skills they need to write research essays in upper-level English courses.

Assignments: two quizzes (each worth 15%), proposal for research essay (10%), research essay (30%), final exam (30%)

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 2
MWF, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

New York high society and its sometimes vicious marriage market at the turn of the twentieth century in Edith Wharton’s House of Mirth, a “Brotherhood” of 1940s communist activists in a city filled with racial tensions in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, the absurd talk-show circuit of Don DeLillo’s drama Valparaiso, homophobic small-town America in Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir Fun Home . . . These are some of the settings and social orders the heroes and heroines of this course have to navigate. We will follow these characters as they sometimes rebel against and sometimes acquiesce to the orders and institutions in which they find themselves. Why isn’t the self easily tamed by society’s demands and norms? We conclude the course with Werner Herzog’s astonishing documentary film about a man among the bears, Grizzly Man. This course offers students an introduction to the skills and practices of literary criticism. Through a focus on writing assignments across the term, students will learn how to ask rich and provocative questions about literary texts, how to build interpretations around highly-focused work with a text’s individual words and images, and how to use literature and film as a lens for understanding historical contexts and social problems. Through invigorating reading and viewing experiences, students will build an arsenal of strong writing techniques for their university futures. Assignments will include two in-class essays, two take-home essays, a final exam, and various informal writing exercises. All details about the course here are subject to revision.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 2
MWF, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

In this class we'll look at love stories old and new and try and tackle some big questions about happy ever after: How do stories shape our expectations and experiences of romantic love? What do our conventional love narratives suggest about gender, sexuality, and marriage? How do individual experiences of love deviate from these narrative--and why should we care? How have our love stories changed along with shifts in cultural attitudes about love and marriage?

Prepare to rethink some of your assumptions about love and romance and investigate our cultural obsession with meet cutes and happy endings.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 2
TTh, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

The tale of “Beauty and the Beast,” first popularized by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont’s didactic retelling of Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve’s story of 1740, has fascinated readers for nearly three centuries. In this course we will explore the tale’s origins, influence, and continuing appeal. What do the multitudinous adaptations and reimaginings tell us about the original and later texts, the societies that produced them, our own society, and ourselves? How have definitions of beauty and beastliness—and exemplary behaviour—changed since 1740? What role do literary texts and their adaptations have in producing, reinscribing, revising, and/or subverting these definitions? What assumptions underlie our responses to “Beauty and the Beast” tales and the numerous literary critical and theoretical approaches we use to interpret them? Our texts and films: Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, “The Story of the Beauty and the Beast,” translated by J. R. Planché; Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, “Beauty and the Beast: A Tale”; Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Oscar Wilde, “The Birthday of the Infanta”; La Belle et la Bête, directed by Jean Cocteau; Angela Carter, “The Courtship of Mr Lyon” and “The Tiger’s Bride”; Beauty and the Beast, animation screenplay by Linda Woolverton; a student-choice twenty-first-century adaptation.

Reading and Writing about Literature
Term 2
TTh, 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

Focused on literary texts in their critical and theoretical contexts, ENGL 100 is a course in academic writing that fulfills the first-year component of the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement.

What, exactly, is a fairy tale? Why do some remain popular even two or three hundred years after they were first published? And why do modern writers so often return to the form, sometimes to rewrite old tales and sometimes to compose brand-new ones? In this course, we will address these questions by reading a variety of classic tales by the Brothers Grimm, Charles Perrault, and Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont as well as modern versions of those tales by Francesca Lia Block and Donna Jo Napoli. We’ll also read recent fairy tales by Neil Gaiman and Philip Pullman that seem to have no literary antecedents. In lectures and discussions we’ll consider how fairy tales have been adapted to meet the needs of distinct historical periods, and how different critical approaches to the same tale can yield entirely different interpretations.

NOTE: THIS IS A GENERAL DESCRIPTION FOR ALL SECTIONS OF ENGL 112.

Through the study and application of the principles of university-level discourse and with emphasis on the specific genre of academic writing, this course will introduce students to critical reading and university-level writing. In lectures and discussions, instructors will focus on the rhetorical principles and strategies central to university-level discourse. Students will examine methods for discovering and arranging ideas, and they will consider ways in which style is determined by rhetorical situation and scholarly audiences. English 112 is not a remedial course. Students with serious deficiencies in their writing should seek early and expert tutorial help.

Note: This course is required of students who intend to enter the Faculties of Commerce and the Schools of Nursing and Physical Education. It is also recommended by a number of other faculties and schools. Students should check the current UBC Calendar for further information about the first-year English requirements for particular faculties and schools.

Course Prerequisite: In order to remain registered in this class, all students must fulfill the First-Year English Course Entry Requirement (LPI). For further details on the First-Year English Course Entry Requirement, please visit:http://english.ubc.ca/first-year-english/frequently-asked-questions-faq/#1.

Course Requirements: regular attendance and participation in class activities; completion of a minimum of four essays (two to be written in class); and a final examination.

Final Examination: All students in English 112 will write a 3-hour final examination at the end of the course. The examination will test critical reading and writing skills by asking students to write two clear, coherent, well-developed essays: one analysing a passage of university-level prose in a way that demonstrates the specific critical skills learned in class, and one writing a scholarly essay in response to specific critical readings studied in class.

Distribution of Marks: course work (essays and exercises), 70 marks; final examination, 30 marks.

Texts:Reading lists for individual sections of the course will be available in the Language and Literature section of the UBC Bookstore in mid-August for Term 1 courses and mid-November for Term 2 courses.


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Language Elective Course

Language Myths
Term 2
MWF, 3:00 - 4:00 p.m.

This course in cross-listed as Linguistics 140 and is co-taught by instructors from the English and Linguistics Departments.

Is language change bad?
Do some people have “good grammar”?
Does language shape culture?
Are teenagers destroying the language?
Is texting destroying the language?
Is learning a language easier for kids?
Does your ability to learn a language reflect your intelligence?
Is all thought linguistic?
Where in your brain is language located?
Do bilinguals have an advantage?

What can we believe of what we hear and read about language? In this course, we will critically examine a broad range of commonly held beliefs about language and the relation of language to the brain and cognition, learning, society, change and evolution. We will be reading a series of short scholarly articles in order to understand language myths, the purpose for their existence, and their validity (or not). We will use science and common sense as tools in our process of “myth-busting” and will ultimately come to understand why language myths will always be with us.

Course readings: A set of readings (available on Connect)

Course requirements: Two midterm examinations (50%), a written project (pairs or groups) (30%), participation and attendance, including “Linguistics outside the classroom) and low-stakes short weekly writing (20%)

For the project, students will select one of the myths and will find a discussion of this myth in popular media (online, newspaper, etc.). They will read one or two of the supplemental readings concerning that myth and will use these readings as well as the material covered in class to argue for or against the point expressed in the popular source.

This course is an excellent introduction for students contemplating  the English Language Major as well as an appropriate elective for students already in the Major.

Note: This course does not fulfill the writing requirements in any faculty or the literature requirement in the Faculty of Arts.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite for all 100-level English courses: Language Proficiency Index (LPI) level 5 or exemption. For further details, please visit http://english.ubc.ca/first-year-english/frequently-asked-questions-faq/#1.

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