2017 Summer Session

Listed below are short descriptions of our 2017 Summer Session courses. The instructor will post the actual course syllabi for registered students shortly before term begins or distribute them on the first day of class. Please check the course schedule for current information about our course offerings.

Literature

Term 1
Mon & Wed, 12:00 - 3:00 p.m.

There is currently no description available for this section of ENGL 110. Please contact the instructor.

Term 1
Mon & Wed, 6:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Students in this course will read a romantic tragedy (Romeo and Juliet), a romantic comedy (Pride and Prejudice) and a story of survival (Into Thin Air: Jon Krakauer’s non-fiction account of 1996 Mount Everest disaster that killed nine climbers). There will also be a selection of poetry.  The readings are relatively brief and commensurate with what the human brain can absorb during six short weeks of warm and sunny weather. Owing to the brevity of the Summer Semester term, the course will focus on fewer texts, but will attempt to cover them in greater depth.

The course requires all students to make a single group presentation, valued at 20 %.

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to some of the skills of literary study, including the techniques of close reading.  There will be two marked in-class close-reading poetry assignments, one near the beginning of the course and one near the end.

Any student who wishes to take this course needs to attend the very first class.

Texts

  • Shakespeare, William.  Romeo and Juliet.
  • Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice.
  • Krakauer, Jon.  Into Thin Air.
  • Custom course package containing poetry.

Evaluation

  • Attendance and participation - 5 %
  • Group presentation - 20 %
  • In class assignment - 20 %
  • In-class close reading exercise - 10 %
  • At-home essay (1,000 words) - 25 %
  • Final exam - 20 %

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
Tue & Thu, 12:00 - 3:00 p.m.

For this section of the course we''ll be reading two contemporary novels by Canadian authors (titles TBA), two plays by British and American authors (ditto), and a selection of thematically interrelated poetry from Canada, the US, and the UK.

In view of the brevity of the six-week summer semester, the course instructor highly recommends reading at least one - and preferably two - of the course texts before Day 1. These include two novels (George and Rue, This Location of Unknown Possibilities) and two plays (Fences, The Importance of Being Earnest)

Term 1
Tue & Thu, 6:00 - 9:00 p.m.

There is currently no description available for this section of ENGL 110. Please contact the instructor.

Term 1
Wed & Fri, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

There is currently no description available for this section of ENGL 110. Please contact the instructor.

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
Mon & Wed, 12:00 - 3:00 p.m.

The renowned writer of weird fiction H.P. Lovecraft famously claimed that “the true weird tale has something more than secret murder, bloody bones, or a sheeted form clanking chains according to rule” – rather “a certain atmosphere of breathless and unexplainable dread of outer, unknown forces must be present.” This section of English 110 will consider drama, poetry, and prose fiction that meets these criteria: stories of monsters, demons, unfathomable horrors, metaphysical mystery, and cosmic awe. We will examine the ways that “weird” literature evokes emotions of wonder, fear, and disgust while engaging with political, social, and philosophical questions, interrogating boundaries, norms, and categories. Beginning with the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf, a blood-soaked tale of monster-hunting in a world governed by a cruel, inhuman fate or “wyrd,” we will trace the literary history of the weird, following it first through the otherworldly Wales of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the fallen, omen-haunted tragedy of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. After the weird wakes from the rationalist nap of Enlightenment we turn to the Romantic poetry of Blake and Coleridge, and then press on to Christina Rossetti’s sensuously malevolent “Goblin Market” and Sheridan le Fanu’s erotic vampire story “Carmilla.” The course concludes with a consideration of early twentieth-century weird fiction, including the short stories of Lovecraft, and with China Miéville’s “New Weird” novel The City & The City.

Term 2
Mon & Wed, 12:00 - 3:00 p.m.

There is currently no description available for this section of ENGL 110. Please contact the instructor.

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
Tue & Thu, 6:00 - 9:00 p.m.

This section of English 110 will introduce students to basic elements of university-level literary study by examining a wide range of works in three genres: poetry, prose fiction, and drama.  These works are of various literary eras and by authors from diverse cultural backgrounds; a few were not originally written in English. Students will be taught methods of literary analysis that should enable them to read each work with care, appreciation, and (one hopes) enjoyment.

Assignments:

  • Two in-class essays, each worth 20%
  • One home essay (1000 words), worth 30%
  • Final exam, worth 30%

Text: Kelly J. Mays, The Norton Introduction to Literature, Portable Twelfth Edition (W.W. Norton, 2016)

Tentative reading list

Poems: William Shakespeare, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”; William Blake, “The Tyger”; Christina Rossetti, “In an Artist’s Studio”; Emily Dickinson, “She dealt her pretty words like Blades—”; Theodore Roethke, “My Papa’s Waltz”; Adrienne Rich, “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers”; Margaret Atwood, “Death of a Young Son by Drowning”; Li-Young Lee, “Persimmons”; Amit Majmudar, “Dothead”

Short stories: Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour”; Anton Chekhov, “The Lady with the Dog”; Gabriel Garcia Márquez, “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”; Toni Morrison, “Recitatif”; Jamaica Kincaid, “Girl”; Amy Tan, “A Pair of Tickets”; Jhumpa Lahiri, “Interpreter of Maladies”

Plays: William Shakespeare, Hamlet; Henrik Ibsen, A Doll House

Writing

NOTE: THIS IS A GENERAL DESCRIPTION FOR ALL SECTIONS OF ENGL 112.

Through the study and application of the principles of university-level discourse and with emphasis on the specific genre of academic writing, this course will introduce students to critical reading and university-level writing. In lectures and discussions, instructors will focus on the rhetorical principles and strategies central to university-level discourse. Students will examine methods for discovering and arranging ideas, and they will consider ways in which style is determined by rhetorical situation and scholarly audiences. English 112 is not a remedial course. Students with serious deficiencies in their writing should seek early and expert tutorial help.

Note: This course is required of students who intend to enter the Faculties of Commerce and the Schools of Nursing and Physical Education. It is also recommended by a number of other faculties and schools. Students should check the current UBC Calendar for further information about the first-year English requirements for particular faculties and schools.

Course Prerequisite: In order to remain registered in this class, all students must fulfill the First-Year English Course Entry Requirement (LPI). For further details on the First-Year English Course Entry Requirement, please visit:http://english.ubc.ca/first-year-english/frequently-asked-questions-faq/#1.

Course Requirements: regular attendance and participation in class activities; completion of a minimum of four essays (two to be written in class); and a final examination.

Final Examination: All students in English 112 will write a 3-hour final examination at the end of the course. The examination will test critical reading and writing skills by asking students to write two clear, coherent, well-developed essays: one analysing a passage of university-level prose in a way that demonstrates the specific critical skills learned in class, and one writing a scholarly essay in response to specific critical readings studied in class.

Distribution of Marks: course work (essays and exercises), 70 marks; final examination, 30 marks.

Texts:Reading lists for individual sections of the course will be available in the Language and Literature section of the UBC Bookstore in mid-August for Term 1 courses and mid-November for Term 2 courses.