McMaster University, PhD

Phanuel Antwi is assistant professor of English at University of British Columbia. He writes, researches, and teaches critical black studies; settler colonial studies; black Atlantic and diaspora studies; Canadian literature and culture since 1830; critical race, gender, and sexuality studies; and material cultures. He has published articles in Interventions, Affinities, and Studies in Canadian Literature, and he is completing a book-length project titled “Currencies of Blackness: Faithfulness, Cheerfulness and Politeness in Settler Writing.”

 

Selected Publications

  • “Dub Poetry as a Black Atlantic Body Archive.” Small Axe 19.3 (November 2015): 65-83.
  • With Veronica Austen. “Cocreation in an uncertain world: An interview with M. NourbeSe Philip.” Jacket 2. (Sept 2013). (https://jacket2.org/interviews/cocreation-uncertain-world)
  • “A Lack of Public Memory: A Public Memory of Lack.” Trans/acting Culture, Writing, and Memory: Essays in Honour of Barbara Godard. Ray Ellenwood, Jennifer Henderson, Eva Karpinski and Ian Sowton (Eds.). Wilfrid Laurier University Press, May 2013. 119-147.
  • With Sarah Brophy, Helene Strauss, and Y-Dang Troeung. “Postcolonial Intimacies: Gatherings, Disruptions, Departures.” Special Issue. “Postcolonial Intimacies.” Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies 15.1 (March 2013). 1-9.
  • With Sarah Brophy, Helene Strauss, and Y-Dang Troeung. “’Not without ambivalence’: An Interview with Sara Ahmed on Postcolonial Intimacies.” Special Issue. “Postcolonial Intimacies.” Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies 15.1 (March 2013). 110-126.
  • With Amber Dean. “Unfixing Imaginings of the City: Art Gentrification, & Cultures of Surveillance.” Affinities: A Journal of Radical Theory, Culture, & Action 4.2 (Fall 2010): 17-27.
  • “Dub Revolushun.” PRECIPICe: A Literary Journal 3.1-2 (2009): 22-33.
  • “Rough Play: Reading Black Masculinity in Austin Clarke’s ‘Sometimes a Motherless Child’ and Dionne Brand’s What We All Long For.” Studies in Canadian Literature 34.2 (2009): 194-222.