2019 Summer Session

Listed below are short descriptions of our 2019 Summer Session courses. The instructor will post the actual course syllabus for registered students shortly before term begins or distribute them on the first day of class.  View the full course schedule here.

Starting in 2019S, there will no longer be any pre-requisite to 100-level English courses.

Literature

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
MW, 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Our Literature class has three Units, all in dialogue with each other: a Unit on gender, a Unit on race and class, and a Unit on place (and rootedness, postnationalism, dislocation, naming, and bounding).

Our Literature class has writers from the world: Vancouver, Australia, Jamaica, Britain, Canada, Nigeria, Virginia, Brooklyn, the USA, Antigua, and Kenya.

Our Literature class will ask that you read, a lot, and you will be rewarded for doing so.

Our Literature class will ask that you write, and your writing will be rewarding.

Approaches to Literature
Term 1

MW, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

All but one of the principal texts in the course are romantic comedies. Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare) starts as comedy but abruptly transforms into tragedy at the mid-point, Pride and Prejudice (Austen) presents romantic comedy in the form of a novel of manners, while The Importance of Being Earnest (Wilde) gently satirizes romantic comedy as a genre. In contrast, in Into the Wild (Krakauer) a young man appears to choose Wilderness as a substitute for relationship, with tragic consequence. There will also be a selection of poetry.  Except for Pride and Prejudice, the readings are relatively brief and commensurate with what the human brain can absorb during six short weeks of warm and sunny weather.

The course requires all students to make a single group presentation, valued at 20 %.

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to some of the skills of literary study, including the techniques of close reading.  There will be two marked in-class close-reading poetry assignments, one near the beginning of the course and one near the end.

Any student who wishes to take this course needs to attend the very first class.

Texts:

  • Shakespeare, William.  Romeo and Juliet
  • Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice
  • Wilde, Oscar. The Importance of Being Earnest
  • Krakauer, Jon.  Into the Wild
  • Frost, Robert. A Boy’s Will and North of Boston (Plus, a custom course package.)

Evaluation:

  • Attendance and participation, 5 %
  • Group presentation, 20 %
  • In class assignment, 20 %
  • In-class close reading exercise, 10 %
  • At-home essay (1,000 words), 25 %
  • Final exam, 20 %

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
TTh, 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

The course description for this section of ENGL 110 is not available at this time. Please contact the instructor.

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
TTh, 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm

This course is designed to introduce students to the three major forms of literature: drama, poetry, and the novel. This edition of 110 will focus on the Renaissance and Romanticism. We’ll practice a variety of approaches, examining literary works from historical, biographical, and psychoanalytical perspectives. The primary objective will be to teach students how to appreciate literature – what it can and cannot do and what distinguishes it from other forms of communication – and write about it in an analytical and scholarly manner.

Required Texts: 

  • Shakespeare, Cymbeline (Oxford UP)
  • Webster, The White Devil (New Mermaids)
  • English Romantic Poetry: An Anthology, ed. Stanley Appelbaum (Dover)
  • Austen, Persuasion (Penguin)

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
TTh, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

The course description for this section of ENGL 110 is not available at this time. Please contact the instructor.

Approaches to Literature
Term 1
WF, 9:30 am - 12:30 pm

“There is no truth…only stories” --Thomas King, Green Grass, Running Water

Literature is informed by the culture in which it is produced (not the culture it depicts) and often relies on historical records of questionable validity. Readings will be drawn from poetry, drama, and fiction from various historical periods, and will focus on history’s entanglement with literature.

Course Requirements: Course requirements include an in-class essay, a term paper, and in-class reflections on readings.

Texts:

  • Shakespeare, Richard III
  • Thomas King, Green Grass, Running Water
  • Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale
  • Tony Kushner, Angels in America, Millennium Approaches
  • Poetry, short stories, available online

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
MW, 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

The course description for this section of ENGL 110 is not available at this time. Please contact the instructor.

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
MW, 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

This section of English 110 will introduce students to basic elements of university-level literary study by examining a wide range of works in three genres: poetry, prose fiction, and drama.  These works are of various literary eras and by authors from diverse cultural backgrounds; a few were not originally written in English. Students will be taught methods of literary analysis that should enable them to read each work with care, appreciation, and (one hopes) enjoyment.

Assignments:

  • Two in-class essays, each worth 20%
  • One home essay (1000 words), worth 30%
  • Final exam, worth 30%
  • Text: Kelly J. Mays, The Norton Introduction to Literature, Portable Twelfth Edition (W.W. Norton, 2017)

Provisional reading list 

Poems: William Shakespeare, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”; William Blake, “The Tyger”; Christina Rossetti, “In an Artist’s Studio”; Emily Dickinson, “Because I could not stop for Death—”; Ezra Pound, “The River-Merchant’s Wife: A Letter”; Theodore Roethke, “My Papa’s Waltz”; Adrienne Rich, “Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers”; Seamus Heaney, “Digging”; Margaret Atwood, “Death of a Young Son by Drowning”; Adrienne Su, “Escape from the Old Country”; Amit Majmudar, “Dothead”

Short stories: Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour”; Anton Chekhov, “The Lady with the Dog”; Gabriel Garcia Márquez, “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”; Toni Morrison, “Recitatif”; Alice Munro, “Boys and Girls”; Jamaica Kincaid, “Girl”; Amy Tan, “A Pair of Tickets”; Jhumpa Lahiri, “Interpreter of Maladies”

Plays: William Shakespeare, Hamlet; Henrik Ibsen, A Doll House

Approaches to Literature
Term 2
TTh, 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

The course description for this section of ENGL 110 is not available at this time. Please contact the instructor.

Writing

This course will use Proctorio (an online remote proctoring service) for invigilation during the final exam. During a Proctorio assessment, you will be recorded via your webcam, and the contents of your computer screen, along with other actions you take on your computer, will also be recorded during the Proctorio session. All of this information will be shared with your instructor and may be shared with designated members of the Learning Technology Hub team for the purpose of review. The recorded information meets British Columbia's Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. In order to use Proctorio, you are required to have access to a regular desktop or laptop computer (Windows or Mac). You cannot complete Proctorio assessments, including final exams, from mobile devices (e.g., iPhone, iPad, Android devices, etc). The computer you use will need a working webcam and microphone. You will need to install the Google Chrome web browser & Proctorio’s Chrome extension. At the start of the course, you will be asked to consent to the use of Proctorio by filling out an online form. If you have any hesitation about consenting, or cannot meet the technical requirements, please select a different section of ENGL 112 or WRDS 150.

 
Through the study and application of the principles of university-level discourse and with emphasis on the specific genre of academic writing, this course will introduce students to critical reading and university-level writing. In lectures and discussions, instructors will focus on the rhetorical principles and strategies central to university-level discourse. Students will examine methods for discovering and arranging ideas, and they will consider ways in which style is determined by rhetorical situation and scholarly audiences. English 112 is not a remedial course. Students with serious deficiencies in their writing should seek early and expert tutorial help.

Note: This course is required of students who intend to enter the Faculties of Commerce and the Schools of Nursing and Physical Education. It is also recommended by a number of other faculties and schools. Students should check the current UBC Calendar for further information about the first-year English requirements for particular faculties and schools.

Course Requirements: regular participation; completion of a minimum of four essays (two to be written in class); and a final examination.

Final Examination: All students in English 112 will write a 3-hour final examination at the end of the course. The examination will test critical reading and writing skills by asking students to write two clear, coherent, well-developed essays: one analysing a passage of university-level prose in a way that demonstrates the specific critical skills learned in class, and one writing a scholarly essay in response to specific critical readings studied in class.

Distribution of Marks: course work (essays and exercises), 70 marks; final examination, 30 marks.

NOTE: *THIS IS A GENERAL DESCRIPTION FOR SECTIONS OF ENGL 112 OFFERED AT UBC VANCOUVER CAMPUS.

Through the study and application of the principles of university-level discourse and with emphasis on the specific genre of academic writing, this course will introduce students to critical reading and university-level writing. In lectures and discussions, instructors will focus on the rhetorical principles and strategies central to university-level discourse. Students will examine methods for discovering and arranging ideas, and they will consider ways in which style is determined by rhetorical situation and scholarly audiences. English 112 is not a remedial course. Students with serious deficiencies in their writing should seek early and expert tutorial help.

Note: This course is required of students who intend to enter the Faculties of Commerce and the Schools of Nursing and Physical Education. It is also recommended by a number of other faculties and schools. Students should check the current UBC Calendar for further information about the first-year English requirements for particular faculties and schools.

Course Requirements: regular attendance and participation in class activities; completion of a minimum of four essays (two to be written in class); and a final examination.

Final Examination: All students in English 112 will write a 3-hour final examination at the end of the course. The examination will test critical reading and writing skills by asking students to write two clear, coherent, well-developed essays: one analysing a passage of university-level prose in a way that demonstrates the specific critical skills learned in class, and one writing a scholarly essay in response to specific critical readings studied in class.

Distribution of Marks: course work (essays and exercises), 70 marks; final examination, 30 marks.

Texts: Reading lists for individual sections of the course will be available in the Language and Literature section of the UBC Bookstore in mid-August for Term 1 courses and mid-November for
Term 2 courses.