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ENGL 200 - New this Fall 2019!

ENGL 200

NEW COURSE: ‘Principles of Literary Studies’
Collaboratively taught by teams of award-winning professors, English 200 mixes lively seminars with shared weekly lectures, introducing students to important developments and practices in the study of literature.

ENGL 348-003

ENGL 348-003

‘Witty Women, Marriage and the Shakespearean Romantic Comedy’
Shakespeare’s comedies are about strong, independent, and witty female characters and the difficulties they face when trying to assert themselves in a patriarchal society. In this course, we will look at six of Shakespeare’s comedies, from the early battle of the sexes, The Taming of the Shrew, to the late “problem” comedy, All’s Well that Ends Well.

New Courses of Interest

New Courses of Interest

We introduced more than 30 new courses starting in 2019 Winter Session. Learn more about our new courses. Explore our course offerings!

ENGL 361-001

ENGL 361-001

NEW COURSE: “Old, Weird, America”

This course, on pre-imperial US literature, gravitates around ‘weird’ nineteenth-century writing that is fascinated by deformed or disfigured bodies, unlikely or extraordinary events, and what is contaminated or impossible.

ENGL 382-001

ENGL 382-001

NEW COURSE: ‘Anti-/De-/Post-Colonization’

We will read and discuss a selection of diverse literary and cultural texts that engage with both critical theory and Indigenous thought and practice in nuanced and creative ways, from short stories and poetry, to films and art installations.

ENGL 360-001

ENGL 360-001

NEW COURSE: “Early Canadian Writing”
How has Canada’s particular colonial history shaped what has been recognised as Canadian literature and culture? How have settlement patterns, geographical features, or political structures affected cultural production in Canada? In this course, we will look at some significant works in Canadian literary culture in English from its emergence in pre-Confederation colonial literature to its development until the end of the World War I.