Dennis Austin Britton

Associate Professor
location_on BUTO 413

Education

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

About

Dr. Britton researches and teaches early modern English literature, with a focus on the history of race, critical race theory, Protestant theology, and the history of emotion.

He is the author of Becoming Christian: Race, Reformation, and Early Modern English Romance (2014), and has recently co-edited a special issue of the journal Spenser Studies on “Spenser and Race.” He is currently working on two books, Shakespeare and Pity: Feeling Difference on the Early Modern English Stage and Reforming Ethiopia: African-Anglo Relations in Protestant England.

Before coming to UBC, he was Associate Professor of English at the University of New Hampshire. He is also passionate about the public humanities—in New Hampshire he served on the board of the state humanities council and as the board president of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire.


Dennis Austin Britton

Associate Professor
location_on BUTO 413

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Britton researches and teaches early modern English literature, with a focus on the history of race, critical race theory, Protestant theology, and the history of emotion.

He is the author of Becoming Christian: Race, Reformation, and Early Modern English Romance (2014), and has recently co-edited a special issue of the journal Spenser Studies on “Spenser and Race.” He is currently working on two books, Shakespeare and Pity: Feeling Difference on the Early Modern English Stage and Reforming Ethiopia: African-Anglo Relations in Protestant England.

Before coming to UBC, he was Associate Professor of English at the University of New Hampshire. He is also passionate about the public humanities—in New Hampshire he served on the board of the state humanities council and as the board president of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire.

Dennis Austin Britton

Associate Professor
location_on BUTO 413

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Britton researches and teaches early modern English literature, with a focus on the history of race, critical race theory, Protestant theology, and the history of emotion.

He is the author of Becoming Christian: Race, Reformation, and Early Modern English Romance (2014), and has recently co-edited a special issue of the journal Spenser Studies on “Spenser and Race.” He is currently working on two books, Shakespeare and Pity: Feeling Difference on the Early Modern English Stage and Reforming Ethiopia: African-Anglo Relations in Protestant England.

Before coming to UBC, he was Associate Professor of English at the University of New Hampshire. He is also passionate about the public humanities—in New Hampshire he served on the board of the state humanities council and as the board president of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire.