Ramesh Mallipeddi

Associate Professor
location_on BUTO 423

Thematic Research Area

Education

Ph.D., Cornell University, 2008

About

I’m an Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literatures. My research on sentimentalism, transatlantic slavery, and the British empire has appeared in Eighteenth-Century StudiesThe Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, and ELH. My monograph,  Spectacular Suffering: Witnessing Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic (Virginia, 2016), shows how the ostensible objects of sentimental compassion—enslaved African people—contended with the forces of capitalist abstraction and produced a melancholic counterdiscourse on slavery. Most recently, I contributed “Profit and Power: Literature and the English Commercial Empire, 1651-1714” to  Emergent Nation: Early Modern British Literature in Transition (Cambridge, 2019); “Varieties of Bondage in the Early Atlantic” to The Cambridge Companion to Early American Literature (2022); and “Roads, Bridges, and Ports: Infrastructures of Plantation Agriculture in the British Caribbean” to The Aesthetic Life of Infrastructure: Race, Affect, Environment(Northwestern, 2022). My special issue of English Language Notes (co-edited with Cristobal Silva) on “Memory, Amnesia, Commemoration” was published in Fall 2019; another special issue of The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation on “Empire, Capital, and Climate Change” will appear in 2023.

My current book project, Expendable Lives, Disposable Lands: Racial Ecologies in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture, 1627-1834, is a study of the conjoined histories of capitalist modernity, imperial expansion, and climate change within the context of plantation agriculture.

I serve on the MLA Forum Executive Committee on Restoration and Early- 18th-Century English Literature (2019-2024). In Fall 2021, I’m one of the plenary speakers at the North Eastern Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (NEASECS) annual meeting; in Spring 2022, I will deliver a lecture in the Tudor and Stuart series in the Department of English at Johns Hopkins University.

I’m also the editor of Eighteenth-Century Studies, the flagship journal of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS).


Publications

Books and Edited Collections

Spectacular Suffering: Witnessing Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic. University of Virginia Press, 2016.

Special issue of English Language Notes (co-edited with Cristobal Silva” on “Memory, Amnesia, Commemoration” (Fall 2019)

Special issue of The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation on “Empire, Capital, and Climate Change” (2023)

 

Journal Articles and Book Chapters

“Soil and Slaves: Racial Ecologies in the Plantation Economy, 1624-1764,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation (2023).

“Varieties of Bondage in the Early British Atlantic,” in The Cambridge Companion to Early American Literature. Ed. Bryce Traister (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2021).

“Roads, Bridges, and Ports: Infrastructures of Plantation Agriculture in the Caribbean,” in The Aesthetic Life of Infrastructure: Race, Resilience, Extraction. Eds. Kelly Rich, Nicole Rizzuto, and Susan Zieger (Northwestern University Press, 2022).

“The Hoe and the Plough: Labor, Agrarian Technology, and Race in the British Caribbean, 1760-1838,” in Science and Storytelling in the Eighteenth Century: Knowledge, Narrative, Discipline. Eds. Danielle Spratt and David Alff (University of Virginia Press, forthcoming).

“Profit and Power: Literature and the English Commercial Empire, 1660-1714,” in Emergent Nation: Early Modern British Literature in Transition. Ed. Elizabeth Sauer (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2019).

“Filiation to Affiliation: Kinship and Sentiment in Equiano’s Interesting Narrative,” English Literary History 81.3 (2014): 925-956.

“‘A Fixed Melancholy’: Migration, Memory, and the Middle Passage.” Special issue on “The Dispossessed Eighteenth Century,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 55.2-3 (2014): 235-254.

“Spectacle, Spectatorship, and Sympathy in Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 45.4 (2012): 475-96.


Ramesh Mallipeddi

Associate Professor
location_on BUTO 423

Ph.D., Cornell University, 2008

I’m an Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literatures. My research on sentimentalism, transatlantic slavery, and the British empire has appeared in Eighteenth-Century StudiesThe Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, and ELH. My monograph,  Spectacular Suffering: Witnessing Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic (Virginia, 2016), shows how the ostensible objects of sentimental compassion—enslaved African people—contended with the forces of capitalist abstraction and produced a melancholic counterdiscourse on slavery. Most recently, I contributed “Profit and Power: Literature and the English Commercial Empire, 1651-1714” to  Emergent Nation: Early Modern British Literature in Transition (Cambridge, 2019); “Varieties of Bondage in the Early Atlantic” to The Cambridge Companion to Early American Literature (2022); and “Roads, Bridges, and Ports: Infrastructures of Plantation Agriculture in the British Caribbean” to The Aesthetic Life of Infrastructure: Race, Affect, Environment(Northwestern, 2022). My special issue of English Language Notes (co-edited with Cristobal Silva) on “Memory, Amnesia, Commemoration” was published in Fall 2019; another special issue of The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation on “Empire, Capital, and Climate Change” will appear in 2023.

My current book project, Expendable Lives, Disposable Lands: Racial Ecologies in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture, 1627-1834, is a study of the conjoined histories of capitalist modernity, imperial expansion, and climate change within the context of plantation agriculture.

I serve on the MLA Forum Executive Committee on Restoration and Early- 18th-Century English Literature (2019-2024). In Fall 2021, I’m one of the plenary speakers at the North Eastern Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (NEASECS) annual meeting; in Spring 2022, I will deliver a lecture in the Tudor and Stuart series in the Department of English at Johns Hopkins University.

I’m also the editor of Eighteenth-Century Studies, the flagship journal of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS).

Books and Edited Collections

Spectacular Suffering: Witnessing Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic. University of Virginia Press, 2016.

Special issue of English Language Notes (co-edited with Cristobal Silva” on “Memory, Amnesia, Commemoration” (Fall 2019)

Special issue of The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation on “Empire, Capital, and Climate Change” (2023)

 

Journal Articles and Book Chapters

“Soil and Slaves: Racial Ecologies in the Plantation Economy, 1624-1764,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation (2023).

“Varieties of Bondage in the Early British Atlantic,” in The Cambridge Companion to Early American Literature. Ed. Bryce Traister (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2021).

“Roads, Bridges, and Ports: Infrastructures of Plantation Agriculture in the Caribbean,” in The Aesthetic Life of Infrastructure: Race, Resilience, Extraction. Eds. Kelly Rich, Nicole Rizzuto, and Susan Zieger (Northwestern University Press, 2022).

“The Hoe and the Plough: Labor, Agrarian Technology, and Race in the British Caribbean, 1760-1838,” in Science and Storytelling in the Eighteenth Century: Knowledge, Narrative, Discipline. Eds. Danielle Spratt and David Alff (University of Virginia Press, forthcoming).

“Profit and Power: Literature and the English Commercial Empire, 1660-1714,” in Emergent Nation: Early Modern British Literature in Transition. Ed. Elizabeth Sauer (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2019).

“Filiation to Affiliation: Kinship and Sentiment in Equiano’s Interesting Narrative,” English Literary History 81.3 (2014): 925-956.

“‘A Fixed Melancholy’: Migration, Memory, and the Middle Passage.” Special issue on “The Dispossessed Eighteenth Century,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 55.2-3 (2014): 235-254.

“Spectacle, Spectatorship, and Sympathy in Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 45.4 (2012): 475-96.

Ramesh Mallipeddi

Associate Professor
location_on BUTO 423

Ph.D., Cornell University, 2008

I’m an Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literatures. My research on sentimentalism, transatlantic slavery, and the British empire has appeared in Eighteenth-Century StudiesThe Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, and ELH. My monograph,  Spectacular Suffering: Witnessing Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic (Virginia, 2016), shows how the ostensible objects of sentimental compassion—enslaved African people—contended with the forces of capitalist abstraction and produced a melancholic counterdiscourse on slavery. Most recently, I contributed “Profit and Power: Literature and the English Commercial Empire, 1651-1714” to  Emergent Nation: Early Modern British Literature in Transition (Cambridge, 2019); “Varieties of Bondage in the Early Atlantic” to The Cambridge Companion to Early American Literature (2022); and “Roads, Bridges, and Ports: Infrastructures of Plantation Agriculture in the British Caribbean” to The Aesthetic Life of Infrastructure: Race, Affect, Environment(Northwestern, 2022). My special issue of English Language Notes (co-edited with Cristobal Silva) on “Memory, Amnesia, Commemoration” was published in Fall 2019; another special issue of The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation on “Empire, Capital, and Climate Change” will appear in 2023.

My current book project, Expendable Lives, Disposable Lands: Racial Ecologies in Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture, 1627-1834, is a study of the conjoined histories of capitalist modernity, imperial expansion, and climate change within the context of plantation agriculture.

I serve on the MLA Forum Executive Committee on Restoration and Early- 18th-Century English Literature (2019-2024). In Fall 2021, I’m one of the plenary speakers at the North Eastern Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (NEASECS) annual meeting; in Spring 2022, I will deliver a lecture in the Tudor and Stuart series in the Department of English at Johns Hopkins University.

I’m also the editor of Eighteenth-Century Studies, the flagship journal of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS).

Books and Edited Collections

Spectacular Suffering: Witnessing Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic. University of Virginia Press, 2016.

Special issue of English Language Notes (co-edited with Cristobal Silva” on “Memory, Amnesia, Commemoration” (Fall 2019)

Special issue of The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation on “Empire, Capital, and Climate Change” (2023)

 

Journal Articles and Book Chapters

“Soil and Slaves: Racial Ecologies in the Plantation Economy, 1624-1764,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation (2023).

“Varieties of Bondage in the Early British Atlantic,” in The Cambridge Companion to Early American Literature. Ed. Bryce Traister (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2021).

“Roads, Bridges, and Ports: Infrastructures of Plantation Agriculture in the Caribbean,” in The Aesthetic Life of Infrastructure: Race, Resilience, Extraction. Eds. Kelly Rich, Nicole Rizzuto, and Susan Zieger (Northwestern University Press, 2022).

“The Hoe and the Plough: Labor, Agrarian Technology, and Race in the British Caribbean, 1760-1838,” in Science and Storytelling in the Eighteenth Century: Knowledge, Narrative, Discipline. Eds. Danielle Spratt and David Alff (University of Virginia Press, forthcoming).

“Profit and Power: Literature and the English Commercial Empire, 1660-1714,” in Emergent Nation: Early Modern British Literature in Transition. Ed. Elizabeth Sauer (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2019).

“Filiation to Affiliation: Kinship and Sentiment in Equiano’s Interesting Narrative,” English Literary History 81.3 (2014): 925-956.

“‘A Fixed Melancholy’: Migration, Memory, and the Middle Passage.” Special issue on “The Dispossessed Eighteenth Century,” The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation 55.2-3 (2014): 235-254.

“Spectacle, Spectatorship, and Sympathy in Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 45.4 (2012): 475-96.